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Tourist Attractions in St. Lucy

Barbados Tourist Attractions in St. Lucy

The parish if St. Lucy in located in the very north of the island and is a dramatic change from the developed neighboring west coast. There are a number of tourist attractions in St. Lucy worth venturing northwards to check them out.

Going to St. Lucy with it’s unspoiled beauty is a must during your stay in Barbados, the geography of this parish is very different to all other coasts as it looks out over the cliff edge to the crashing violent seas of the Atlantic Ocean.

Here you will find the Animal Flower Cave, which is home to filter feeding tube worms known as ‘animal flowers‘, although their numbers have depleted over the years, there are still a few worth looking at and the cave itself is very beautiful after years of the Atlantic crashing against the rock to form this inlet.

This part of the island also lends itself for perfect surfing conditions for the experienced surfer, and most professionals will head up to St. Lucy to visit Maycock’s Bay for the ultimate wave to ride. It is also a nice beach to spectate if you are not confident on a surfboard.

There are only a couple of small beaches in this parish and extreme caution needs to be exercised when visiting them as the tide comes in and you will be cut off, so please check the times of high tide before venturing down these cliffs. The bays are Cove Bay, which commands a stunning view of the east coast, Little Bay and River Bay.

There is a stunning old plantation house in St. Lucy called Fustic House, with a natural swimming pool carved out of the rocks. The house is not open to the public but is available to rent as private residence if you wanted a unique hideaway with all the luxury that you would expect from a private villa in Barbados.

The famous rum of Barbados is Mount Gay and in St. Lucy you will find where the rum got it’s name and that is a hill called Mount Gay, which was home to the family who first made the rum, there is a still a working plant here processing the sugar and turning it in to molasses.

And finally in St. Lucy you will find a number of old Anglican churches, which are open to the public and lovely to look around. They are St. Lucy’s Parish Church, St. Clements Church, and St. Swithin’s Church.